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Updated: 1 year 15 weeks ago

Offset limestone layers at Broom Point

Sat, 07/27/2019 - 4:42am

Yesterday, I featured some folds from Broom Point, but there are also faults there. With the intriguing local limestone conglomerates providing easily-discernible marker beds, these apparently vertical faults are easy to spot. Here are three examples:

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New Research Confirms It: The Warming is Us

Fri, 07/26/2019 - 9:38pm

The leading climate myth going around these days (I see it a lot on social media)  is that the record global warmth is just part of a natural cycle. It’s been shown in many ways that this is not possible for quite some time, but some people (not the science community) have held onto the “Little Ice Age” as evidence that the warming planet is from only natural oscillations. New …

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Friday folds: Broom Point, Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland

Fri, 07/26/2019 - 4:34am

Here’s a look at some of the outcrops at Broom Point, within sight of the famous uplifted fjord called Western Brook Pond: The limestone beds here are Ordovician in age, and they dip to the east: In places through there are folds to be spotted in the beds:

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Sol 2477: Records measured in degrees

Thu, 07/25/2019 - 7:00pm

Curiosity is currently tilted 25° - more than ever before, during science operations. The image above shows just how much this is.

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The site of the Pingdi landslide, in Shiucheng County, China

Thu, 07/25/2019 - 5:22pm

Planet Labs satellite images suggest that the road across the Pingdi landslide in China, which killed about 45 people this week, was widened with cut slopes in the months before the failure

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Porcupine Glacier Major Iceberg Turns 3 Years Old, What Next?

Thu, 07/25/2019 - 8:10am

Porcupine Glacier in Landsat images from 2016 and 2018 and 2019 Sentinel Image.  Iceberg A and Ice tongue B are indicated on each. The haziness in 2019 is forest fire smoke. The yellow arrows mark the 2019 terminus location. Porcupine Glacier is a 20 km long outlet glacier of an icefield in the Hoodoo Mountains of Northern British Columbia that terminates in an expanding proglacial lake. During 2016 the glacier …

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Melting ice may change shape of Arctic river deltas

Thu, 07/25/2019 - 8:00am

Thawing ice cover and easily erodible permafrost may destabilize Arctic river deltas, according to new research. A new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters finds sea ice and permafrost both act to stabilize channels on Arctic river deltas.

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Sol 2476: The Southern Escarpment Almost Within Reach

Wed, 07/24/2019 - 7:00pm

This morning Curiosity found herself parked at the base of the southern escarpment of the Visionarium. She's at a significant tilt of 21 degrees; you can see the slope of the horizon in the attached image.

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Shuicheng County: a very large, fatal landslide in Guizhou Province, China

Wed, 07/24/2019 - 3:52pm

A large landslide occurred in Shuicheng County, in Liupanshui City, Guizhou Province in China on Tuesday 22nd July 2019, killing up to 45 people

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The latest adventures from the R/V Falkor

Wed, 07/24/2019 - 11:02am

Seven of the latest posts from the ongoing research cruises.

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Scientists take high-speed video of waves to better understand sea spray

Wed, 07/24/2019 - 9:00am

Waves crashing on seashores generate tiny droplets of water known as sea spray. Sea spray moves heat and water from the ocean to the atmosphere, but scientists are unsure which part of the wave-breaking process generates the most spray, whether it be wind shear, splashing, or the popping of air bubbles at the surface of the wave. To address this question, scientists generated breaking waves experimentally in a lab. They used a wave tank about the size of an average bowling lane to create miniature versions of plunging breakers, where the wave crest curls over itself and plunges downward.

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Sol 2475: Powering Through!

Tue, 07/23/2019 - 7:00pm

It's winter for Curiosity, and it's cold. That means that we have to spend extra energy heating up the instruments and motors for our activities. All of our energy comes from batteries, charged by the RTG. The RTG gives us more power than solar panels would, but in the winter, we are still limited by the amount of power it can generate.

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Sol 2474: A Great Outcrop!

Tue, 07/23/2019 - 7:00pm

When we see outcrops like this one that show a vertical exposure of laminated rocks, we capture it in high resolution Mastcam images so that scientists can look for sedimentary structures that give us clues as to how the rock formed.

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Add common names to your manuscript and talk titles

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 11:51am

I'm walking down a row of posters at a meeting of ecologists and a see the title, Non-target effects of an organochlorine pesticide on Mentior tacomii in aquatic settings. I think, "Neat!" I studied the effects of pesticides on amphibians and reptiles as a researcher so I'm always up for learning about contamination in other systems. The problem is that I have no freaking clue what M. tacomii is. And I'm not alone.

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Sol 2472-2473: Additional Contact Science and a Soliday at Sandside Harbour

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 11:00am

Curiosity is still parked in front of an outcrop known as 'Sandside Harbour' in order to investigate differences in the lighter and darker outcrop expressions.

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Dragons of summer now on the hunt

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 10:29am

Worldwide, there are about 3,000 species of dragonfly. Thirty types live in Alaska. The largest in the state is the lake darner, a cool blue dragonfly that turns dark when the air is chilly.

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A First Geophysics Job with Project Apollo

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 9:34am

In 1972, after my freshman year at MIT, Prof. Nafi Toksoz was kind enough to hire me to work in his research group that used data from seismometers the Apollo astronauts installed on the moon. I learned a lot from these excellent scientists, and (hopefully) helped them a little. It was exciting to have even a very minor part in a group investigating the moon’s structure and evolution.  I figure …

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Convergence: A Call for More Robust Global Science Collaboration

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 9:21am

At AGU, we often say that science has no borders and takes no political sides. Science has the powerful ability to make profound impacts on nations, economies, and local communities. However, a tide of nationalism across the globe — manifested in the form of incendiary social media posts, trade wars, reactionary protectionism, and even overt violence — is on the rise. And often hand-in-hand with nationalism comes scientific disinformation campaigns …

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Monday Geology Picture: Dinosaur Stampede Trackways

Mon, 07/22/2019 - 7:48am

This week I’m sharing a few pictures of an incredible display at the Queensland Museum of a dinosaur stampede – the only known record of a dinosaur stampede. The display shows an area in Queensland, Australia, where there are thousands of dinosaur footprints (more than 3,000) of more than 130 different dinosaurs, all in an area about the size of a tennis court! Recently, there has been some debate about …

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50 Years Ago Today

Sat, 07/20/2019 - 12:57am

Where was I at 30 seconds past 4:17 PM EDT 50 years ago today? When the Eagle landed on the Moon I was in a car north of Tulsa in Oklahoma with my Great Grandmother. Annie Higgins was an amazing woman who as a girl walked to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) behind a covered wagon. She remembered reading in the paper of the Wright Bros. flight. She watched the news-reels …

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