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Updated: 42 weeks 14 hours ago

Study shows how to produce natural gas while storing carbon dioxide

Thu, 06/27/2019 - 12:51pm

New research shows that injecting air and carbon dioxide into methane ice deposits buried beneath the Gulf of Mexico could unlock vast natural gas energy resources while helping fight climate change by trapping the carbon dioxide underground.

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Climate Change Threatens to Produce More Intense Hurricanes. Federal Funding Must Keep Up

Thu, 06/27/2019 - 10:56am

Henry Potter earned a BS in geography at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana and a PhD in applied marine physics at the University of Miami in Florida. He completed a postdoc at the Naval Research Laboratory Remote Sensing Division in Washington, DC and became an assistant professor of oceanography at Texas A&M University in 2016. Henry focuses his research on the marine boundary layer in order to better understand air-sea …

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Mount Iliamna: a large landslide in Alaska on 20th June 2019

Thu, 06/27/2019 - 2:01am

A very large landslide occurred on the flanks of Mount Iliamna, a volcano located in Alaska, on 21st June 2019.

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Sol 2449: Keep on rollin’ through the rubble to "Harlaw"

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 8:00pm

Curiosity is continuing our exploration of Glen Torridon (the clay-bearing unit) and the varied lithologies exposed in this area of Gale crater, including more rubbly bedrock that is mixed with sand, and more coherent bedrock exposed both in the ground and capping prominent ridges.

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Climate change is transforming northernmost Arctic landscapes

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 12:44pm

Isachsen, a permafrost monitoring site that sits at a latitude of 78 degrees north on the Arctic Canadian island of Ellef Ringnes, seemed like the last place that would feel the effects of climate change.

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Sol 2448: Very Small Rocks

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 9:00pm

Our drive on Sol 2447 stopped a bit short, placing us on an area that was mostly gravel. Nothing against gravel, but we are eager to get to the outcrops ahead of us, so we went with a pretty light plan for today to allow more time and energy for driving.

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Sol 2447: Making a Lien List, Checking it Twice

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 8:00pm

Today's plan wrapped up our time at the Teal Ridge outcrop and we'll begin to drive Curiosity toward the next waypoint in the clay-bearing unit of Gale Crater.

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Cruise blog: More observing seafloor methane seeps at the edge of hydrate stability

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 5:44pm

Six new blog posts from the continuing Hunting Bubbles research cruise.

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AGU Calls Upon the U.S. Senate to Support Federal Funding for Earth and Space Science

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 3:54pm

In this short video message from AGU CEO/Executive Director Chris McEntee, she heralds the U.S. House of Representatives’ recent passage of a FY20 budget supporting federal Earth and space scientific agencies and calls upon the Senate Appropriations Committee to follow the House’s lead in order to ensure that the American scientific enterprise remains robust. For more information, please visit: actioncenter.agu.org

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Doing Hydrogeology in R

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 12:45pm

Use programming languages to interact with, analyze, and visualize data is an increasingly important skill for hydrogeologists to have. Coding-based science makes it easier to process and visualize large amounts of data and increase the reproducibility of your work, both for yourself and others.

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Ice-squeezed aquifers might create marsquakes

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 10:00am

As the Mars InSight lander begins listening to the interior of Mars, some scientists are already proposing that some marsquakes could be signals of groundwater beneath the frozen surface of the Red Planet. The idea, proposed by Michael Manga, a planetary scientist at the University of California at Berkeley, and his colleagues, is that Mars could be experiencing quakes a lot like those being felt in Oklahoma and Texas due to wastewater injections from fracking. 

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Sols 2444-2446: The View from Teal Ridge

Tue, 06/25/2019 - 9:00am

Curiosity is still perched on top of Teal Ridge to investigate a fascinating outcrop that caps the ridge. The above Navcam image shows the view off to the right of Curiosity. The ridge-capping material is visible in the foreground, and the background shows where Curiosity is going to drive to next.

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