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Updated: 42 weeks 4 days ago

Celebrating 100,000 students doing field work on the Rio Grande

Thu, 08/29/2019 - 3:18pm

Since 1996 "100,000 students have walked the halls, tested in the labs, and hiked these trails,” observed Rep. Deb Haaland.

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North Cascade Glacier Climate Project 2019, 36th Annual Assessment

Thu, 08/29/2019 - 12:27pm

 The summer of 2019 found the North Cascade Glacier Climate Project in the field for the 36th consecutive summer monitoring the response of North Cascade glaciers to climate change.  This long term monitoring program was initiated partly in response to a challenge in 1983 from Stephen Schneider to begin monitoring glacier systems before and as climate change became a dominant variable in their behavior. The field team was comprised …

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Researchers find new ways for coral reef ecosystems to grow

Thu, 08/29/2019 - 10:21am

Particulate organic matter from the open ocean has a bigger-than-expected role in the growth and health of coral reefs, say researchers studying declining coral reefs in Hawaii.

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Women’s Equality Day Q&A with Jacquelyn Gill

Thu, 08/29/2019 - 8:28am

August 26th is Women’s Equality Day. To celebrate women’s contributions to Earth and space science, we’re devoting this week to featuring Q&As with inspirational women in STEM. #WomensEqualityDay!   Today, we’re excited to feature Jacquelyn Gill, Assistant Professor of Paleoecology & Plant Ecology at the University of Maine. Jacquelyn received her PhD in Geography at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her BA in Human Ecology at College of the Atlantic. …

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Some Climate Related Facts About the Big Trouble Brewing in The Caribbean

Wed, 08/28/2019 - 6:47pm

There is an old saying among forecasters that “There is almost always a hurricane on the Atlantic weather map on Labor Day.” Well, Dorian exploded into a hurricane this morning, and it now looks ever more likely there will be a major hurricane near the Florida Coast early Monday (Labor Day). A big hat tip to Katherine Hayhoe for this link about how climate change is impacting hurricanes.

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Upper Nile will experience more water scarcity due to hotter, drier periods

Wed, 08/28/2019 - 9:00am

An increase in hotter, drier years in the coming decades due to climate change may worsen water scarcity issues in the Upper Nile Basin. These impacts are likely to cause an increase in agricultural failure in Ethiopia and may potentially lead to civil strife, according to the authors of a new study published in Earth’s Future, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

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Women’s Equality Week Q&A with Kelsi Singer

Wed, 08/28/2019 - 8:31am

August 26th is Women’s Equality Day. To celebrate women’s contributions to Earth and space science, we’re devoting this week to featuring Q&As with inspirational women in STEM. #WomensEqualityDay!   Today, we’re thrilled to feature Kelsi Singer, a Senior Research Scientist at Southwest Research Institute and recipient of the 2019 Harold C. Urey Prize in Planetary Science. Kelsi received her PhD in Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University in St. …

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Streaks in Aurora Found to Map Features in Earth’s Radiation Environment

Tue, 08/27/2019 - 4:45pm

A special kind of streaked aurora has been found to track disturbances in near-Earth space from the ground. Known as structured diffuse aurora, it was recently discovered, with the help of NASA spacecraft and instruments, that these faint lights in the night sky can map the edges of the Van Allen radiation belts — hazardous concentric bands of charged particles encircling Earth.

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Cluster and XMM-Newton pave the way for SMILE

Tue, 08/27/2019 - 10:45am

The Solar wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) mission is still four years away from launch, but scientists are already using existing ESA satellites, such as the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory and the Cluster mission studying Earth's magnetosphere, to pave the way for this pioneering venture.

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Scientists forecasted late May tornado outbreak nearly four weeks before it ripped through U.S.

Tue, 08/27/2019 - 10:00am

“This is the first documented successful long-range forecast for an extended period of tornado activity in the U.S.,” said lead author Victor Gensini, a professor of meteorology at Northern Illinois University.

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Women’s Equality Week Q&A with Alexis Wilson

Tue, 08/27/2019 - 8:00am

August 26th is Women’s Equality Day. To celebrate women’s contributions to Earth and space science, we’re devoting this week to featuring Q&As with inspirational women in STEM. #WomensEqualityDay!   Today, we’re excited to feature Alexis Wilson, who is starting her PhD in Earth System Science at Stanford University. Alexis received her B.S. in Environmental and Sustainability Sciences from Cornell University. Find Alexis online, on Twitter, @DrAlexisWilson, and on Instagram, @alexis_m_wilson. …

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Ship emissions responsible for thousands of premature deaths in China’s Pearl River Delta

Mon, 08/26/2019 - 11:55am

Ship emissions caused more than 1,200 ozone-related and 2,500 particulate-related premature deaths in the Pearl River Delta region in 2015, according to new research in the AGU journal GeoHealth. The new study also predicts that implementing new coastal emission controls could reduce mortality due to fine particulates by 30 percent and ozone by 10 percent by 2030.

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Women’s Equality Day Q&A with Bianca Vasquez

Mon, 08/26/2019 - 10:19am

August 26th is Women’s Equality Day. To celebrate women’s contributions to Earth and space science, we’re devoting this week to featuring Q&As with inspirational women in STEM. #WomensEqualityDay!   Today, we’re thrilled to feature Bianca Vasquez, Test Site Engineering-Propulsion Intern at Virgin Orbit and founder of the Society of Women in Space Exploration (SWISE). Bianca is studying Mechanical Engineering at Santa Barbara City College. Find Bianca and SWISE on social …

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Climate change is altering winter precipitation across the Northern Hemisphere

Mon, 08/26/2019 - 10:00am

A team of scientists has successfully teased out the influence of human-caused climate change on wintertime precipitation over much of the last century, showing that the warming climate is significantly altering wintertime rainfall and snowfall across the Northern Hemisphere.

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What it means to students when you can pronounce their names – and when you can’t

Sun, 08/25/2019 - 10:36am

I don’t think we can over-emphasize the importance of learning student names and the correct pronunciation of their names in our courses. Our introductory-level geoscience classrooms are especially important for recruiting new majors and producing Earth science-literate citizens. If we don’t have a class identity as a supportive and inclusive community for learning and working together, what impact can and will that have for our departments, the discipline, and society as a whole?

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Sols 2506-2508: Until we meet again

Fri, 08/23/2019 - 8:00pm

Today was the final opportunity to actively command Curiosity before the Sun comes between us and Mars. Most of the instruments are safely stored for the solar conjunction break, but intrepid Navcam was available for some last-minute science observations.

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Friday fold: a return to coastal Greenland

Fri, 08/23/2019 - 9:48am

We return for today's Friday fold to a site on the coast of Greenland's King Oscar Fjord, featured in photographs by Alistair Knock, that first graced Mountain Beltway's digital pages eight years ago.
Who wouldn't want to buy that fold?

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Sols 2504-2505: Packing up for our journey behind the Sun

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 8:00pm

The days leading up to a big trip can be hectic. There are preparations to be made, belongings to be packed, extra work to do in anticipation of being away from the computer. And it's no different for a robot on the surface of Mars.

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The Disappearance of Multiple Baffin Island Glaciers 2002-2019

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 4:19pm

Glaciers at Point A and B have melted completely away. The commemoration of a single disappearing glacier in Iceland, Okjokull has brought attention to what is quite a common event this decade, glacier disappearance. Here we report on a number of glaciers in the southern part of the Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island  that have either disappeared or separated into several parts  from 2002-2019. Way (2015) noted that on the next peninsula …

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We Have Your Backs: Supporting the Work of Brazilian Earth Scientists

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 9:08am

Where scientific findings have not conveniently fit into the ideological preferences of political leaders around the world, science and scientists are increasingly under attack. In a symposium on human rights threats to scientists at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting in Washington, DC, an Iranian environmental scientist shared a chilling story about learning of his imminent arrest if he were to return home from an international trip. Other participants shared stories …

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