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Three million pounds of frozen moose

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 4:28pm

The magnificent creature was fooled by vocal plumbing — similar to its own but much smaller — imitating the groan of a receptive female. The bull moose grunted twice, then strode through spruce trees at the far side of a river. Brushing branches away with its antlers, it emerged, expecting to see a cow moose.

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Friday fold: the Brooks Range, Alaska

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 4:31am

It's Friday, thank goodness. Today our "Friday fold" feature heads north, way north, to the Brooks Range of Alaska. There we find a trio of mountainsides exposing folds photographed in the 1990s.

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Landslide tsunamis from the Sulawesi earthquake

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 4:24am

A new video has appeared on Youtube showing the multiple landslide tsunamis generated by the Sulawesi earthquake in Indonesia.

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Talchako Glacier, British Columbia Retreat 1987-2018

Thu, 10/18/2018 - 4:46pm

Talchako Glacier change revealed in 1987 and 2018 Landsat images.  Red arrow is 1987 terminus location, yellow arrow 2018 terminus, orange arrow a tributary from the north and purple dots the snowline.  Talchako Glacier is the largest outlet glacier of the Monarch Icefield in the Coast Range of British Columbia and is the headwaters of the Talchako River. VanLooy and Forster (2008) noted that the glacier retreated at a rate of …

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Twist hackles, kayaks, and stream capture…for real!

Thu, 10/18/2018 - 12:14pm

This week’s post was inspired by the photo below. Seldom will you see such lovely patterns generated by tensional failure of any material, much less polyethylene! If this type of feature is unfamiliar, just google “plumose structures” and you’ll find all you need.

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A clearer path to clean air in China

Thu, 10/18/2018 - 10:51am

China has invested billions of dollars to clean up its deadly air pollution, focusing intensely on reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide from coal-burning power plants. A new study shows reducing formaldehyde emissions may be the key to clearing winter air.

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Sounds of a Solar Storm

Thu, 10/18/2018 - 10:26am

High school students listening to audio tracks of NOAA satellite data have identified the sounds of solar storms buffeting Earth’s magnetic field. The results of a UK-led citizen science project suggest that the approach of converting physical data into sound signals could help NOAA and other scientists make sense of massive amounts of data from satellites and other instruments.

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Is A Changing Climate Shifting Tornado Alley?

Wed, 10/17/2018 - 6:38pm

An important paper by Harold Brooks and Victor Gensini is out today, and it looks at how the atmospheric conditions that produce tornadoes have changed since 1979. The data shows a clear shift toward the Southeast U.S. with a decrease in the Plains. This is not good since the increase is in an area of higher population, and in an area where a larger percentage of people live in tornado death traps. These traps are …

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Wed, 10/17/2018 - 2:01pm

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A Passion for Paleontology: Going Beyond Brontosaurus

Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:39pm

Today is the fourth day of Earth Science Week, National Fossil Day. We talked to paleontologists Hearth Ford of Queen Mary University of London, Ryan Haupt of the University of Wyoming, and Andrew Zaffos of the Arizona Geological Survey in the University of Arizona. Ryan has previously celebrated National Fossil Day with us here at The Bridge. Read his post here. Fossils, the remains and traces of organisms, often invoke imagery of …

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Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

Wed, 10/17/2018 - 11:28am

Long-term melting may lead to release of huge volumes of cold, fresh water into the North Atlantic, impacting global climate.

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What inspires you? Earth Science Week 2018

Wed, 10/17/2018 - 8:44am

Earth Science Week inspires me to take action to facilitate education and awareness to the campus and local community about Earth science. How are you inspired to share Earth science?

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The Big Oyster, by Mark Kurlansky

Wed, 10/17/2018 - 7:47am

Mark Kurlansky might be the king of the micro-history. His books Salt and Cod were both excellent examinations of history in the context of those minerals and fishes. So when I saw The Big Oyster on the audio-book shelf at my public library, I checked it out, knowing roughly what I would get – a history anchored to that particular delicious mollusk. In this case, it’s a history of New …

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Collecting from the Deep

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 2:54pm

Characterizing Venting and Seepage Along the California Coast: Collecting from the Deep By Jennifer Berglund and Charlotte Seid  You might not expect to find snails, sponges, or worms in the emergency room or medicine cabinet, but they are often a surprising source of lifesaving drugs. Marine organisms – mostly those from accessible shallow waters – have enabled the discovery of more than 30,000 new molecules with potential medical applications. And …

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Serpentine Hot Springs stone points raise questions

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 11:17am

Stone spear points from Serpentine Hot Springs on the Seward Peninsula hint that ancient people may have migrated northward between ice sheets from warmer parts of America, bringing their technology with them.

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Backyard Deep — Week One Video

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 10:53am

Hundreds of meters below the surface of the ocean, where sunlight does not reach, researchers are finding communities as biologically dense as rainforests. Find out about the tools scientists are using to discover and learn about the methane seeps just off the coast of California.

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Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 10:17am

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

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Mechanical Muse

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 11:04pm

Leighton Rolley – one of the lead marine technicians on R/V Falkor – has a reputation for wild ideas. When he suggested I use the manipulator arm on our Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV SuBastian) to make a painting, I did not want to get my hopes up that such a unique opportunity might be possible.

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Time Scavengers and Science Literacy: 6 Tips for Creating Online Resources

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 1:05pm

Today is the second day of Earth Science Week, Earth Science Literacy Day. We talked to Adriane Lam and Jen Bauer of Time Scavengers, an online resource for both scientific and non-scientific audiences that addresses a range of topics from climate change to geoscience careers. Adriane and Jen have previously been featured on AGU’s Plainspoken Scientist blog. With the rise of social media and other web platforms, science — or false …

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Interning for the National Park Service through “Geoscientists-in-the-Parks”

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 11:20am

What do saber-tooth tigers, sheep ranches, sagebrush, and supervolcanoes have in common? They’re all in eastern Oregon! A former “Geoscientist-in-the-Park” writes about her time as an interpretive intern at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument this past summer.   The John Day Basin is dry, remote, and starkly beautiful. Over 50 million years of geology is recorded in the rugged mountains of the region, providing a glimpse into the …

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