American Geophysical Union

Syndicate content
A Community of Earth and space science blogs
Updated: 1 hour 44 min ago

Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Not My Normal Desk Job

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 8:20pm

By Jenny Walker This mission has taken me out of my depth, both personally and professionally. I’m a Computer Scientist, less than a year into my PhD at the University of Southampton. My job back on land is to develop new ways of automatically summarizing the information available in images gathered on an AUV dive, and while this is still my main focus, data handling at sea has been an …

The post Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Not My Normal Desk Job appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

In the field with Albuquerque Sign Language Academy

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 1:37pm

Following the footsteps of crews of young adults from the deaf and hard of hearing community who work with Rocky Mountain Youth Corps (RMYC), this crew was created for individuals who want to engage with conservation and outdoor work but who are too young to participate in the RMYC crews.

The post In the field with Albuquerque Sign Language Academy appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Five Starfish Ahead

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 12:19pm

Research expeditions are like marathons. Preparation for them is exhaustive and requires extremely disciplined individuals following a careful schedule in order to reach their goals.

The post Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Five Starfish Ahead appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

New technology could improve radiation risk warnings for future deep-space astronauts

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 10:00am

New technology that detects radiation from the Sun in real time and immediately predicts subsequent health risks could protect astronauts on future deep-space missions, according to a new study. Astronauts face dangers during solar energetic particle, or SEP, events, which occur when an eruption in the Sun’s atmosphere hurls high-energy protons out into space. These protons can penetrate the walls of a spacecraft and enter the human body. This radiation can cause immediate effects such as nausea, performance degradation and other acute radiation syndromes, while long-term effects can include cancer, degenerative tissue damage, heart disease and damage to the central nervous system.

The post New technology could improve radiation risk warnings for future deep-space astronauts appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Friday folds: Moomaw Reservoir outcrops

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 9:14am

Break out your paddle and sunhat. We're going kayaking on Lake Moomaw, in search of Friday folds...

The post Friday folds: Moomaw Reservoir outcrops appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sol 2143-2144: False Alarm!

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 8:00pm

The planning day began with an interesting result from the previous plan's ChemCam RMI analysis of a target that was referred to as 'Pettegrove Point Foreign Object Debris' (PPFOD), and speculated to be a piece of spacecraft debris.

The post Sol 2143-2144: False Alarm! appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Smoke From Western Wildfires Reaches Europe

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 6:13pm

Some stunning images from the GOES-16 this afternoon. The western U.S. wildfire smoke is now visible over much of Canada and into the northeastern U.S. It’s also clearly visible all the way across the Atlantic to the coast of Portugal! Look at the imagery below: Another view courtesy of CIRA at Colorado State: Now, look at the smoke across the Atlantic. That land at the right edge of the image …

The post Smoke From Western Wildfires Reaches Europe appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Federal Agency Scientific Integrity Survey Results Released

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 5:00pm

Tuesday, results of a 2018 Scientific Integrity Survey of 16 federal agencies administered by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and the Center for Survey Statistics and Methodology (CSSM) at Iowa State University were released. Among the agencies surveyed were the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). AGU provided the funding to ensure that USGS would be included. The survey itself, which asked for …

The post Federal Agency Scientific Integrity Survey Results Released appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Acceleration of mountain glacier melt could impact Pacific Northwest water supplies

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 9:45am

Seasonal snow and ice accumulation cause glaciers in the Cascade Range mountains to grow a little every winter and melt a little every summer. This annual melt provides water for much of the Pacific Northwest, which includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho and parts of Montana. Inhabitants of the region utilize this water for drinking, crop irrigation, generating hydroelectric power and other uses. Glacier melt provides supplementary water when less snowmelt is available, alleviating drought conditions or other impacts of dry periods.

The post Acceleration of mountain glacier melt could impact Pacific Northwest water supplies appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

A suite of deformational features in Lancaster limestones

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 2:43am

In the Landisville Quarry, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, there is a quarry that cuts into Cambrian limestones. (The exact identity of these limestones is apparently a matter of some dispute, but that’s not going to stop us!) I visited the quarry in June on a field trip offered through the NAGT’s Eastern Section annual meeting. We witnessed multiple varieties of deformation there. First off, there was straight-up brittle extension, resulting in bedding-perpendicular …

The post A suite of deformational features in Lancaster limestones appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

E8 – Bonus Clip: Scientists of the Corn

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 3:00pm

Check out this clip that didn’t make it into our recent episode, The Dark Sound of the Moon, with Trae Winter about balloons, astronauts. and aliens! [thirdpodfromthesun id=36225148]

The post E8 – Bonus Clip: Scientists of the Corn appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Amazon pirating water from neighboring Rio Orinoco

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 1:14pm

The Amazon River is slowly stealing a 40,000-square-kilometer (25,000-square-mile) drainage basin from the upper Orinoco River, according to new research suggesting this may not be the first time the world’s largest river has expanded its territory by poaching from a neighbor. The rare conjunction could help researchers understand how river systems evolve and how the Amazon Basin grew to dominate the South American continent.

The post Amazon pirating water from neighboring Rio Orinoco appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Making the Best Use

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 12:00pm

The Adaptive Robotics expedition is different from many research cruises in that the results will not simply be data such as samples, maps, or measurements.

The post Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Making the Best Use appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sols 2141-2142: Taking a closer look at the Stoer sample

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 8:00pm

In today's plan, Curiosity begins analysis of the long-awaited Pettegrove Point drill sample at the 'Stoer' target, which was successfully collected last week

The post Sols 2141-2142: Taking a closer look at the Stoer sample appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 12:00pm

More than 100 oceanic floats are now diving and drifting in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica during the peak of winter. These instruments are gathering data from a place and season that remains very poorly studied, despite its important role in regulating the global climate.

The post Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

“Eggos rock…Iggy Azalea rocks…IG-KNEE-US rocks?”- In Celebration of International Youth Day

Tue, 08/14/2018 - 9:26am

This post was originally posted on our From the Prow blog here.  By Claudia Corona When you’ve been a student for longer than you’ve been able to tie your shoes, and when you’ve been uttering words that would be considered a gem on a Scrabble board for at least a quarter of your life, you gain special powers of scientific enunciation which should be used for good. Such thoughts dawned on me …

The post “Eggos rock…Iggy Azalea rocks…IG-KNEE-US rocks?”- In Celebration of International Youth Day appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Adaptive robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Ask us anything!

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 4:04pm

A few days ago we invited anyone who was interested to ask Principal Investigator Dr Blair Thornton (University of Southampton) and the international engineering team on Schmidt Ocean Institute’s research vessel Falkor questions about underwater robotics and our current expedition.

The post Adaptive robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Ask us anything! appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Five Senses

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:07pm

Marcel Proust’s quote “Not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes” resonates with the work of the Adaptive Robotics team. The experts aim to advance the way in which humanity is able to observe the oceans, and push the experience further, tapping into the potential of all five senses.

The post Adaptive Robotics at Barkley Canyon and Hydrate Ridge: Five Senses appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sol 2138-2140: Success at Pettegrove Point!

Sun, 08/12/2018 - 8:00pm

On our third attempt at drilling within the Pettegrove Point member on the Vera Rubin Ridge, we have success! Curiosity has successfully drilled, and generated a pile of drill tailings.

The post Sol 2138-2140: Success at Pettegrove Point! appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

“Eggos rock…Iggy Azalea rocks…IG-KNEE-US rocks?”- In Celebration of International Youth Day

Sun, 08/12/2018 - 2:00pm

When you’ve been a student for longer than you’ve been able to tie your shoes, and when you’ve been uttering words that would be considered a gem on a Scrabble board for at least a quarter of your life, you gain special powers of scientific enunciation which should be used for good. Such thoughts dawned on me two summers ago, when I was introducing the rock cycle and its respective …

The post “Eggos rock…Iggy Azalea rocks…IG-KNEE-US rocks?”- In Celebration of International Youth Day appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.