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Continuing AGU’s Legacy in Publishing: AGU Advances’ New Editor in Chief

9 hours 44 min ago

Last August, I announced the launch of AGU Advances, a new gold open access publication that will enhance our well-respected portfolio of journals by featuring cutting-edge scientific research. I am proud to announce that Susan Trumbore will serve as the inaugural editor in chief of AGU Advances. Trumbore is director of the Department of Biogeochemical Processes at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. She also holds a …

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Aurora create speed bumps in space

11 hours 12 min ago

A new study finds a type of high-altitude aurora are responsible, at least in part, for moving pockets of air high into the atmosphere where they can cause drag on passing satellites.

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Microbes hitch a ride on high-flying dust

Mon, 04/22/2019 - 11:00am

High-altitude dust may disperse bacterial and fungal pathogens for thousands of miles, seeding far-flung ecosystems and potentially impacting human health

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New research explains why Hurricane Harvey intensified immediately before landfall

Mon, 04/22/2019 - 10:10am

A new study explains the mechanism behind Hurricane Harvey’s unusual intensification off the Texas coast and how the finding could improve future hurricane forecasting.

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Connecting Kids to Real World Science through Children’s Books

Mon, 04/22/2019 - 8:30am

Many science education projects for elementary school age kids start with the assumption that, in order to get kids interested in the science, there needs to be a character like “Barbara Bacteria” or “Larry the Lava Flow” to get their attention. In my over twenty years of experience as a science educator and children’s author, I feel confident in saying that this is not the case.

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Monday Geology Picture: Glass House Mountains, Australia

Mon, 04/22/2019 - 7:17am

I have been terribly neglecting my blog this year. However, I have a good excuse: over the past few months I have accepted a new job working as a geologist for Anglo American… and  I have moved my family to beautiful Brisbane, Australia. On top of that, I am mother to a young son (18 months old now) and I’m also studying part-time… so, I have my hands very full! …

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North Cascade 2019 Winter Accumulation Assessment

Sat, 04/20/2019 - 12:25pm

April 1 winter accumulation at the longer term North Cascade SNOTEL stations (Fish Lake, Lyman Lake, Park Creek, Rainy Pass, Stampede Pass and Stevens Pass). For North Cascade glaciers the accumulation season provides that layer of snow, that must then last through the melt season.  A thin layer sets the glaciers up for a mass balance loss, much like a bear with a limited fat layer would lose more mass …

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Taroko Gorge: a dashcam video of a very near-miss with a co-seismic rockfall in Taiwan

Sat, 04/20/2019 - 4:33am

Taroko Gorge: a dashcam video has been posted to Youtube showing a very near-miss with an earthquake-triggered rockfall in Taiwan

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Sol 2383 – 2385: Drill all the rocks!

Fri, 04/19/2019 - 8:00pm

In this image, you can see Curiosity resting the point of the drill on the future Kilmarie drill target along with the old Aberlady drill hole, a little to the left of the arm.

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Key Takeaways from the EGU General Assembly 2019

Fri, 04/19/2019 - 3:08pm

Fresh off an early-morning flight from Vienna, Austria, to DC last week, I was reflecting on every moment from the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). There were more than 16,000 attendees from 113 countries representing many scientific disciplines. It was an honor to see so many students and early-career scientists as the international presence of AGU continues to grow. As a founding society member of the Societies …

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Birds large and small sniff their way through life

Fri, 04/19/2019 - 10:00am

In the 1820s, painter and naturalist John James Audubon designed an experiment to test if birds had a sense of smell. He dragged a rotten hog carcass into a field, then piled brush on top of it. After none of the local turkey vultures appeared, Audubon concluded that vultures hunted using their eyes alone.

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Friday fold: Angel Island “III”

Fri, 04/19/2019 - 7:04am

For the third Friday in a row, "Mountain Beltway" features folds from Angel Island, in northern San Francisco Bay, California, This time, it's meta-cherts on Perles Beach, showing impressive metamorphic recrystallization reactions.

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Sol 2382: After the drill is before the drill…

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 8:00pm

Some days just give me goose bumps. First, looking at yesterday's plan for Curiosity, I realized that we did something really unusual overnight: Wrap up the drill activity on one site and start the drill activities on the next in the same sol.

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Starting the Journey:  AGU Fall Meeting, Getting There Is the First Hurdle

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 1:48pm

My story is not the usual one. For a while, “party crasher” was my so-called handle throughout the AGU community. As a naïve second year graduate student, I inadvertently crashed the newly elected AGU Council President’s gathering. Not a recommendation by any means but, in my case, it turned out to be a rare opportunity to meet extraordinary individuals who not only saw my potential but also helped shape who …

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AGU Honored with the First Clean Energy DC Award

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 11:53am

As the leader of an innovative, forward looking organization, I am proud to share that AGU received the very first Clean Energy DC Award to honor its commitment to sustainability through our newly renovated headquarters building, the first net-zero energy commercial renovation in Washington, D.C. This award was presented to AGU during the District Sustainability Awards ceremony on 17 April 2019. Each year, the Washington, D.C., Department of Energy and …

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The Moon’s crust is really cracked

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 10:00am

The bombardment of asteroids and meteoroids that pockmarked the Moon's surface over the eons also created fractures reaching deep into the lunar crust, report researchers in a new study in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

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A dramatic debris flow video

Thu, 04/18/2019 - 4:10am

A new video posted to Youtube shows a debris flow cascading over a cliff above a mountain road, with a trapped 4x4. The location and timing are unclear.

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Sol 2381: Goodbye, My Fair Aberlady

Wed, 04/17/2019 - 8:00pm

Curiosity is finishing up at 'Aberlady' and ready to move on to our next drill target. We are preparing to drill a second hole in the clay bearing unit. Reaching this region, and drilling has been a goal since Curiosity landed over 6 years ago...

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Innoko is a long river short on people

Wed, 04/17/2019 - 1:24pm

A quick comparison of two great rivers in America: One, the Wabash, runs 503 miles through Indiana, flowing past 4 million people on its journey to the Ohio River. The other, the Innoko, slugs its way 500 miles through low hills and muskeg bogs in west-central Alaska to reach the Yukon. About 80 people live on the Innoko, all of them in the village of Shageluk.

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The Dragon Behind the Glass, by Emily Voigt

Wed, 04/17/2019 - 7:02am

A whole book about aquarium fish? Yes, it’s possible, when the fish is the Asian arowana. The subtitle of Emily Voigt’s The Dragon Behind the Glass is “A True Story of Power, Obsession, and the World’s Most Coveted Fish.” The arowana is a fish that can be found in the Amazon (sometimes called the ‘water monkey’ there for its habit of jumping out of the water) but another species can …

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