American Geophysical Union

Syndicate content
A Community of Earth and space science blogs
Updated: 32 min 12 sec ago

Friday fold: a return to coastal Greenland

5 hours 35 min ago

We return for today's Friday fold to a site on the coast of Greenland's King Oscar Fjord, featured in photographs by Alistair Knock, that first graced Mountain Beltway's digital pages eight years ago.
Who wouldn't want to buy that fold?

The post Friday fold: a return to coastal Greenland appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sols 2504-2505: Packing up for our journey behind the Sun

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 8:00pm

The days leading up to a big trip can be hectic. There are preparations to be made, belongings to be packed, extra work to do in anticipation of being away from the computer. And it's no different for a robot on the surface of Mars.

The post Sols 2504-2505: Packing up for our journey behind the Sun appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

The Disappearance of Multiple Baffin Island Glaciers 2002-2019

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 4:19pm

Glaciers at Point A and B have melted completely away. The commemoration of a single disappearing glacier in Iceland, Okjokull has brought attention to what is quite a common event this decade, glacier disappearance. Here we report on a number of glaciers in the southern part of the Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island  that have either disappeared or separated into several parts  from 2002-2019. Way (2015) noted that on the next peninsula …

The post The Disappearance of Multiple Baffin Island Glaciers 2002-2019 appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

We Have Your Backs: Supporting the Work of Brazilian Earth Scientists

Thu, 08/22/2019 - 9:08am

Where scientific findings have not conveniently fit into the ideological preferences of political leaders around the world, science and scientists are increasingly under attack. In a symposium on human rights threats to scientists at the 2018 AGU Fall Meeting in Washington, DC, an Iranian environmental scientist shared a chilling story about learning of his imminent arrest if he were to return home from an international trip. Other participants shared stories …

The post We Have Your Backs: Supporting the Work of Brazilian Earth Scientists appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Reports of multiple fatal landslides in the Wenchuan area of China

Wed, 08/21/2019 - 10:43pm

Various news agencies in China are reporting multiple landslides triggered by extreme rainfall in the Wenchuan area, and adjacent regions, of China. Reports suggest 44 people have been killed or are missing.

The post Reports of multiple fatal landslides in the Wenchuan area of China appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

This May be the Best Cloud Formation Picture Ever!

Wed, 08/21/2019 - 10:42pm

Don Burdick took a photo in Rehoboth Beach Tuesday afternoon that just may be the most stunning cloud image I’ve seen. This image makes a meteorologist’s jaw drop but Don’s partner, who works at NOAA in Washington, had to convince him that it really was one of the all-time great images of what is called a shelf cloud! What you are seeing is the shelf cloud from one storm (in …

The post This May be the Best Cloud Formation Picture Ever! appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Study provides new clues to source of methane gas on Mars

Wed, 08/21/2019 - 4:52pm

A team of researchers led by scientists at York University’s Lassonde School of Engineering has created a model of how methane changes on Mars throughout the day by using data from a satellite, the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and the Curiosity Rover. In the past, each had measured significantly different amounts of methane on Mars. The new measurements provide more clues that could help to understand what processes are important in creating the methane coming from a large 154 km- wide crater on the planet, Gale crater.

The post Study provides new clues to source of methane gas on Mars appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Practicing Leadership as an Introvert

Wed, 08/21/2019 - 12:07pm

In higher ed, the weight of the word “leadership” has ballooned over the years, with growing pressure for undergraduate as well as graduate students to somehow demonstrate the quality. Given the challenge of breaking into the workforce after graduation, it does wonders to have a strong quality like leadership help boost a resume. Now, some people are born with leadership qualities, some get unexpectedly thrown into the position, while some people …

The post Practicing Leadership as an Introvert appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

The Kavalappara landslide in the western Ghats of India

Tue, 08/20/2019 - 9:54pm

At 7:30 pm on 8th August 2019 the large Kavalappara landslide in Wayanad District in India buried a small community, killing 59 people.

The post The Kavalappara landslide in the western Ghats of India appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sol 2502-2503: Science to Exhaustion

Tue, 08/20/2019 - 3:00pm

Mars is about to be hidden behind the Sun, so Curiosity is rushing to get science done before communications are temporarily lost.

The post Sol 2502-2503: Science to Exhaustion appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Scientists Roast Heartland Twitter Post

Tue, 08/20/2019 - 4:02am

“Twitter is the only invention in human history that makes it possible to show the entire world your ignorance in two sentences.”- Me The Heartland Institute got roasted by a lot of scientists on Twitter this past weekend, and it was well deserved. I wish they would do more of these because these tweets show how the denial of climate change has become the province of conspiracy theorists (and perhaps …

The post Scientists Roast Heartland Twitter Post appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

A high resolution Planet Labs image of the Pingdi landslide in China

Mon, 08/19/2019 - 10:39pm

A Planet Labs high resolution satellite image of the 23rd July 2019 Pingdi landslide in Liupanshui, Guizhou, China, which killed 51 people

The post A high resolution Planet Labs image of the Pingdi landslide in China appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

When biologists stocked Alaska with wolves

Mon, 08/19/2019 - 1:38pm

Alaska had been a state for one year in 1960 when its department of fish and game conducted a wolf-planting experiment on Coronation Island in southeast Alaska. At the time, the remote 45-square-mile island exposed to the open Pacific had a high density of blacktailed deer and no wolves.

The post When biologists stocked Alaska with wolves appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Centennial E9 – The Sun and the Exploding Sea

Mon, 08/19/2019 - 4:30am

In 1972, in the waning years of the Vietnam War, U.S. military pilots flying south of Haiphong harbor in North Vietnam saw something unexpected. Without explanation, and without warning, over two dozen sea mines suddenly exploded. While the phenomenon was never officially explained, it piqued the interest of space scientist Delores Knipp.

The post Centennial E9 – The Sun and the Exploding Sea appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Alpine Glaciers-BAMS State of Climate 2018

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 2:45pm

Figure 1. Global Alpine glacier annual mass balance record of reference glaciers submitted to the World Glacier Monitoring Service, with a minimum of 30 reporting glaciers. For the last decade I have written the section on Alpine Glaciers for the BAMS State of the Climate report, the 2018 report was published this week, below is the section on alpine glaciers.  The key data resources is  the World Glacier Monitoring Service …

The post Alpine Glaciers-BAMS State of Climate 2018 appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Friday fold: near Mistaya Lodge in the Canadian Rockies

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 5:03pm

Quick, awesome Friday fold here from the Canadian Rockies and Maggie Romuld: Maggie also posted another intriguing image of her hiking in the Canadian Rockies – and set geoTwitter abuzz with a discussion of whether she had captured load casts bulging out of the bottom side of a bed or stromatolites projecting upward from the top of a bed. Have a look & read the ensuing discussion here. Happy Friday!

The post Friday fold: near Mistaya Lodge in the Canadian Rockies appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Sol 2499-2501: More SAMple analysis

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 10:00am

Conjunction is the few-week period when Mars goes behind the sun and we stop communicating with our spacecraft that are there. Our last planning day before conjunction will be next Friday, and thinking about that fast approaching day feels very similar to thinking about getting ready to leave for vacation.

The post Sol 2499-2501: More SAMple analysis appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Help students with a “gravity assist”

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 10:11pm

This semester, think about providing students a "gravity assist", a moment in their lives where something or someone helps propel them to their goal(s)

The post Help students with a “gravity assist” appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Unprecedented 2018 Bering Sea ice loss repeated in 2019

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 3:07pm

Sea ice in the Bering Sea reached record-low levels during winter 2018, thanks to persistent warm southerly winds. These conditions caused the ice to retreat to the northern reaches of the 800,000 square mile body of water. By the end of April 2018, sea ice was about 10 percent of normal. And then, much to scientists’ surprise, 2019 just missed eclipsing the record set in 2018.

The post Unprecedented 2018 Bering Sea ice loss repeated in 2019 appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.

Wakelet – the new (& in my opinion better) Storify

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:23am

I spend a lot of time on social media, specifically Twitter. It's my job. Our @AGU_SciComm account is one of the primary ways to disseminate Sharing Science information, AGU happenings, new science in the field of scicomm, popular science pieces around policy and communication, and more. Twitter is also where I turn to for hashtag campaigns, especially those centered around AGU.

The post Wakelet – the new (& in my opinion better) Storify appeared first on AGU Blogosphere.