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Longjing village: successful prediction of a significant rockslide

3 hours 38 min ago

On 17 February 2019 a >1 million cubic metre rockslide occurred at Longjin village in Guizhou Province. The failure was predicted using a monitoring system

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Things You Should Probably Stop Saying to Your Meteorologist

Thu, 02/21/2019 - 10:48pm

Meteorologist Dakota Smith posted the following video. You should check out his YouTube channel as well. Spot on Dakota!

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6 Steps to Creating a Triumphant Resume

Thu, 02/21/2019 - 10:34am

Do you find job searching to be time consuming, frustrating, and possibly even disappointing? When you are competing against so many other applicants for one job opening, it’s best to be prepared so you can apply quickly and with the least amount of stress. It is your responsibility to quickly demonstrate that you are a match for the job qualifications, and the organization. It is the employer’s job to figure …

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Earth’s atmosphere stretches out to the Moon – and beyond

Wed, 02/20/2019 - 8:10am

A recent discovery based on observations by the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO, shows that the gaseous layer that wraps around Earth reaches up to 630,000 km away, or 50 times the diameter of our planet.

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January 2019 Was Third Hottest On Record, and No It’s Not a”Natural Cycle.”

Wed, 02/20/2019 - 12:30am

NOAA announced today that January was the third hottest on record and the ten warmest have all been since 2002. Think about that for a second. If you think that the climate is not changing, then that statistic is impossible to reconcile. Oh, you may say that this is just a warm period globally, and the thermometer record is not long enough to have any meaning. Well, that record is extended …

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New on EarthArXiv: a first analysis of the flank failure of the Anak Krakatau volcano

Tue, 02/19/2019 - 3:43am

A paper has recently been posted to EarthArXiv providing an analysis of the flank failure of Anak Krakatau on 22 Dec 2018, which generated a tsunami that killed 431 people.

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Boulder Glacier, Mount Baker Washington Retreat 1980-2018

Mon, 02/18/2019 - 10:20am

Boulder Glacier terminus position 1980-2018 as measured in the field. Note Lahar path that descends from Sherman Crater.  Lahars have also occurred subglacially during our field observations. Boulder Glacier flows down the east side of Mount Baker a strato volcano in the North Cascades of Washington. This steep glacier responds quickly to climate change and after retreating more than 2 kilometers from its Little Ice Age Maximum, it began to …

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Jewelry…for science!

Mon, 02/18/2019 - 9:00am

Now, when science is increasingly under attack, I’ve been focusing my efforts on activism in the best way I know how… through making art.

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Water: underground source for billions could take more than a century to respond fully to climate change

Mon, 02/18/2019 - 6:00am

While climate change makes dramatic changes to weather and ecosystems on the surface, the impact on the world’s groundwater is likely to be delayed, representing a challenge for future generations.

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The giant Daguangbao landslide: superheated steam and hot carbon dioxide

Mon, 02/18/2019 - 2:23am

The runout of the one cubic kilometre Daguangbao landslide was controlled by complex processes in a basal layer that may have been just 0.1 mm thick

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The Public Face of Science Initiative

Sun, 02/17/2019 - 10:12am

The Public Face of Science project seeks to ask and answer questions about the complex and evolving relationship between scientists and society and to examine how trust in science is shaped by individual experiences, beliefs, and engagement with science

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A LiDAR perspective on a 1965 geologic map

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 10:50am

...how much existing geologic maps, particularly those produced without any digital topography or remote sensing, could be enhanced by checking them against LiDAR hillshade. The answer varies, and to continue the Powell Valley Anticline discussion, I draped a 1965, hand-drafted geologic map over the new LiDAR hillshade background.

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Centennial E3 – Rifts Beneath the Ocean Floor

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 10:31am

Kathy Crane is a true adventurer. As one of the first women in the field of marine geophysics in the 1970s, she hypothesized and then helped discover the existence of hydrothermal vents on the Galápagos Rift along the East Pacific Rise in the mid-1970s and was one the first people to see many of the strange creatures that make their home in this improbable environment.

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Jabbing sensors into the Denali Fault

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 10:25am

“For some reason, when I come to this terrain, I know something’s been pulverized.” Cole Richards says this while watching three companions kick their steps Chilkoot-Pass style into an abrupt hill. The slope rises from the pancake floodplain of the Nenana River just behind him. The landscape here seems a bit confused.

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Sausalito: a mudslide damages houses in California

Fri, 02/15/2019 - 2:13am

Heavy rain in California, brought by an atmospheric river event, triggered a significant mudslide in Sausalito yesterday, causing damage to several houses

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Make the invisible in your science community, visible

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 9:37pm

Who is in your science community? Think about making sure to identify all individuals that are part of your science work - truck drivers, janitors, administrative assistants, etc. With a simple acknowledgement, they will feel like a part of the science community as well.

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Friday fold: an arch of gypsum in Sicily

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 7:16am

Ahh, Sicily on a Friday morning. Join us to examine a spectacular arch of gypsum from the Messinian evaporite package.

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Happy Science Valentine’s Day!

Thu, 02/14/2019 - 5:19am

In which we offer you a series of valentines to scientific fields of study.

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Sols 2320-2323: Onwards to Midland Valley

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 7:00pm

Today was a very busy planning day for the Curiosity operations team. We planned a 3-sol plan, with contact science, imaging, environmental monitoring and a drive.

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Boydell Glacier, Antarctica Rapid Retreat 2001-2017

Wed, 02/13/2019 - 11:21am

Boydell Glacier, Antarctica retreat in Landsat images from 2001 and 2017,  terminus in 2001 at red dots in 2017 at yellow dots.  A-E are reference points.  Boydell Glacier flows east from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and prior to the 1980’s was joined with the Sjogren Glacier as a principal feeder glacier to Prince Gustav Ice Shelf.  This 1600 square kilometer ice shelf connecting the Peninsula to James Ross Island disintegrated in the …

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