June 4, 2012

Early human activity has left a greater footprint on today's ecosystem than previously thought, says a CHANS-Net scientist working with colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh and in the multidisciplinary Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, created by the National Science Foundation to investigate ecological processes over long temporal and broad spatial scales. Highlighted in the June issue of BioScience, the study shows how historic human actions caused changes in nature that continue to reverberate throughout present-day ecosystems.

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May 29, 2012

Two journals have issued calls for papers for upcoming special issues focusing on wetlands, sustainability and risk analysis.

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May 25, 2012

CHANS-Net member Matteo Convertino, of the University of Florida and the Risk and Decision Science Team of the Engineering R&D Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is looking for potential collaborators for a symposium he has proposed at the Society for Risk Analysis Annual Meeting, Dec. 9-12 in San Francisco.

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May 1, 2012

Using nature’s beauty as a tourist draw can boost conservation in China’s valued panda preserves, but it isn’t an automatic ticket out of poverty for the human habitants, a unique long-term study shows.

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April 27, 2012

Continued expansion of industrial-scale oil palm plantations on the island of Borneo will become a leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 unless strong forest and peatland protections are enacted and enforced, according to a National Academy of Sciences study co-authored by a CHANS-Net member.

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Complete this online survey: http://dels-registration.nas.edu/s3/LCM.

April 24, 2012

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences National Research Council Committee on Needs and Research Requirements for Land-Change Modeling is assessing the future research requirements for spatially-explicit land-change models and is requesting input from CHANS-Net land modelers.

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April 12, 2012

A CHANS-Net researcher and colleagues have definitively linked an increase in ocean acidification to the collapse of oyster seed production at a commercial oyster hatchery in Oregon, where larval growth had declined to a level considered by the owners to be "non-economically viable."

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April 11, 2012

The dates for the American Geophysical Union’s 2012 Fall Meeting have been changed to Monday, Dec. 3-Friday, Dec. 7, with pre-meeting events and workshops scheduled for Sunday, Dec 2.

Previously published deadlines will not change. The deadline for session proposals remains April 20; abstract and town hall submissions will open on June 12 and will close on Aug. 8; registration and housing open on July 12.

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April 11, 2012

New research suggests that allowing more Pacific salmon to spawn in coastal streams will not only benefit the natural environment, including grizzly bears, but could also lead to more salmon in the ocean and thus larger salmon harvests in the long term -- a win-win for ecosystems and humans.

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April 9, 2012

When most people look at a forest, they see walking trails, deer yards, or firewood for next winter. But CHANS-Net scientists at the Harvard Forest and Smithsonian Institution take note of changes imperceptible to the naked eye -- the uptake and storage of carbon. What they've learned in a recent study is that an immense amount of carbon is stored in growing trees, but if current trends in Massachusetts continue, development would reduce that storage by 18 percent over the next half century. Forest harvesting would have a much smaller impact.

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