Sept. 20, 2016

Boston and Baltimore. Miami and Minneapolis. Phoenix and Los Angeles. Fanned across the U.S. and in locations from coast to prairie to desert, what do these cities have in common? Perhaps how their human residents tend that icon of America, the urban lawn.

What's right outside our doors -- our lawns -- may be one of the best indicators of where cities and towns need to address sustainability, according to Peter Groffman of the City University of New York.

Groffman is one of 13 recipients of grants made in 2016 by the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) program, which supports research that examines the complex interactions between human and natural systems. Total funding for 2016 CNH grants is $16.7 million.

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Sept. 2, 2016

A special issue entitled “Telecoupling: A New Frontier for Global Sustainability” is being planned for the interdisciplinary journal Ecology and Society. The special issue seeks to bring together the latest advances and applications in the field of telecoupling to tackling real-world sustainability issues across diverse systems and at local to global scales.

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June 27, 2016

Seeking to strike the balance between human and natural systems means finding ways to incorporate conservation criteria based on minimal human impact into economic evaluation. CHANS-Net member Kostas Bithas, professor of environmental and natural resources economics at Panteion University in Athens, Greece,  and colleagues publish on that idea in Conservation Biology.

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Sept. 14, 2015

In today’s globalized world, humans and nature are inextricably linked. The coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) framework provides a lens with which to understand such complex interactions.

One of the central components of the CHANS framework involves examining feedbacks among human and natural systems, which form when effects from one system on another system feed back to affect the first system.

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Sept. 11, 2015

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced 16 recipients of grants made in 2015 by Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) program. Total funding for the 2015 CNH grants is $20.4 million. The program has been issuing awards since 2001.

CNH is co-funded by NSF's Directorates for Biological Sciences (BIO); Geosciences (GEO); and Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences (SBE).

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Oct. 21, 2010

How do humans and their environment interact, and how can we develop an understanding of these processes to adapt to a planet undergoing far-reaching climate and other environmental changes?

To answer these and related questions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded 14 grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the country to study coupled natural and human systems.

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Sept. 21, 2011

Water quality and environmental health in Botswana; wetlands in a working landscape; the collapse of the ancient Maya and what that has to tell us about society and environmental change today.

These and other projects that address how humans and the environment interact are the focus of $21 million in National Science Foundation (NSF) grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the country to study coupled natural and human systems.

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Sept. 25, 2013

How and why is tea quality vulnerable to changing climate conditions, and how do these changes affect farming communities and land-use strategies?

Researchers funded by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) program will use tea production and consumption systems as a case study to explore the complex interactions among human and natural systems.

They will look at how links among tea agroecosystems, markets and farmers are affected by increased climate variability and resulting socioecological feedbacks.

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Aug. 20, 2014

Mountain pine beetles, tiny bark beetles the size of grains of rice, have become widespread pests. The insects infest tree after tree in western North America, killing off entire swaths of forests during outbreaks.

The effects of climate change and other factors have led to the unprecedented epidemic. Tens of millions of acres of trees have been killed over the past 20 years.

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June 22, 2015

Scientists are certain: We’re entering a mass extinction that threatens humanity’s existence.

Paul Ehrlich, CHANS-Net member and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and his coauthors call for fast action to conserve threatened species, populations, and habitat, but warn that the window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

"[The study] shows without any significant doubt that we are now entering the sixth great mass extinction event," said Ehrlich, professor of population studies in biology.

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