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Updated: 12 hours 15 min ago

This Ant-Sized Radio Is Powered by the Messages It Receives

14 hours 21 min ago
This Ant-Sized Radio Is Powered by the Messages It Receives

A joint team of engineers from UC Berkeley and Stanford University have printed an ant-sized radio onto a silicon chip that harvests energy from the signals it receives.

The post This Ant-Sized Radio Is Powered by the Messages It Receives appeared first on WIRED.








Uncovering Hidden Text on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus

14 hours 22 min ago
Uncovering Hidden Text on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus

A team of researchers is using a technique called multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden text on a 500-year old map used by Christopher Columbus to plan his first voyage across the Atlantic.

The post Uncovering Hidden Text on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus appeared first on WIRED.








Absurd Creature of the Week: The Naked Mole Rat Could One Day Save Your Life

Fri, 09/12/2014 - 6:30am
 The Naked Mole Rat Could One Day Save Your Life

“Sic semper tyrannis,” Brutus supposedly yelled as he helped assassinate Julius Caesar: Thus always to tyrants. John Wilkes Booth exclaimed the same to the panicked crowd in Ford’s Theater after he shot Lincoln. And in dark underground burrows in east Africa, I’m willing to bet the homely yet somehow charming naked mole rat is yelling […]

The post Absurd Creature of the Week: The Naked Mole Rat Could One Day Save Your Life appeared first on WIRED.








For Filmmakers, Higher Frame Rates Pose Opportunities—And Challenges

Fri, 09/12/2014 - 6:30am
For Filmmakers, Higher Frame Rates Pose Opportunities—And Challenges

The next generation of technology is presenting new opportunities—and new challenges—for film makers, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has launched a research project to study how technical details like frame rates, dynamic range, color gamut, and resolution affect the cinematic experience.

The post For Filmmakers, Higher Frame Rates Pose Opportunities—And Challenges appeared first on WIRED.








Using Smartphones to Track Our Everyday Moral Judgments

Thu, 09/11/2014 - 2:00pm
Using Smartphones to Track Our Everyday Moral Judgments

Our lives are surprisingly packed with morally loaded experiences. We see others behaving badly (or well), and we behave well (or badly) ourselves. In a new study, researchers used a smartphone app to track moral and immoral acts committed or witnessed by more than 1,200 people as they went about their days. It's one of the first attempts to quantify the moral landscape of daily life, and it contains some interesting hints about how people are influenced by the behavior or others, as well as by their own political and religious leanings.

The post Using Smartphones to Track Our Everyday Moral Judgments appeared first on WIRED.








Science Graphic of the Week: Using Cameras and Fancy Algorithms to Track Spinning Space Junk

Thu, 09/11/2014 - 6:30am
 Using Cameras and Fancy Algorithms to Track Spinning Space Junk

A team from MIT has come up with an algorithm that could let cleanup crews match a target's movement so they can safely snatch it up.

The post Science Graphic of the Week: Using Cameras and Fancy Algorithms to Track Spinning Space Junk appeared first on WIRED.








The Art of Sewing Science Into Beautiful Quilts

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 6:30am
The Art of Sewing Science Into Beautiful Quilts

Anna Von Mertens is an artist who explores humanity's highs and lows. And while needle, thread and fabric are her medium, she typically uses science as a lens, because there's usually some scientific phenomena that helps her translate how she feels about an event or subject.

The post The Art of Sewing Science Into Beautiful Quilts appeared first on WIRED.








Fantastically Wrong: The Legend of the Kraken, a Monster That Hunts With Its Own Poop

Wed, 09/10/2014 - 6:30am
 The Legend of the Kraken, a Monster That Hunts With Its Own Poop

In mari multa latent, goes the old saying: “In the ocean many things are hidden.” And it’s true enough. There is still much we don’t know about what lurks in the depths, save for wonders that the occasional submersible dive turns up. But for millennia, humans have simply taken to guessing what could be swimming […]

The post Fantastically Wrong: The Legend of the Kraken, a Monster That Hunts With Its Own Poop appeared first on WIRED.








Newly Discovered ‘Tetraquark’ Fuels Quantum Feud

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:30am
Newly Discovered ‘Tetraquark’ Fuels Quantum Feud

Newly discovered particles have incited a fierce debate among experts about the correct picture of matter at the quantum scale.

The post Newly Discovered ‘Tetraquark’ Fuels Quantum Feud appeared first on WIRED.








New Maps Show Where Birds Will Fly as Earth’s Climate Changes

Tue, 09/09/2014 - 6:30am
New Maps Show Where Birds Will Fly as Earth’s Climate Changes

Audubon shared their data about how climate change might affect bird habitat with Map Lab, and we used it to make maps.

The post New Maps Show Where Birds Will Fly as Earth’s Climate Changes appeared first on WIRED.








Clever Trout Match Chimps in a Cognitive Challenge

Mon, 09/08/2014 - 12:01pm
Clever Trout Match Chimps in a Cognitive Challenge

Certain forms of collaboration are supposed to be so sophisticated that only the smartest creatures---namely humans and perhaps a few close relatives---are capable of them. Yet this exclusive club has a new and unexpected member: a species of fish, a class of animals seldom associated with high-level intelligence.

The post Clever Trout Match Chimps in a Cognitive Challenge appeared first on WIRED.








Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved

Mon, 09/08/2014 - 6:30am
Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved

James Cutting, a psychologist at Cornell University has been studying the evolution of cinema over the past century. He's identified several ways in which movies have changed, all of which, he argues, help hold the attention of audiences.

The post Data From a Century of Cinema Reveals How Movies Have Evolved appeared first on WIRED.








The Most Absurd Creatures on Earth, From Satanic Geckos to Fairy Armadillos

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 6:30am

Well, here we are. Absurd Creature of the Week made it one year without getting canceled. It seems like just yesterday when I awkwardly asked WIRED’s resident GIF expert to make one of a pearlfish swimming up a sea cucumber’s bum. Or when I wrote about tiny marsupials that have sex until the males go […]

The post The Most Absurd Creatures on Earth, From Satanic Geckos to Fairy Armadillos appeared first on WIRED.








New High-Res Satellite Sees Through Smoke to Image Fires

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 2:56pm

Mapping major fires from above makes a lot of sense, but it’s often complicated by smoke obscuring what is happening on the ground. However, satellites with special infrared sensors can essentially see through the smoke to the fire, and a new satellite launched last month can do this at the highest resolution yet. These images […]

The post New High-Res Satellite Sees Through Smoke to Image Fires appeared first on WIRED.








Science Graphic of the Week: Mapping Mars’ Missing Ice

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 1:45pm

Scientists use gullies made from melted ice, and their associated alluvial fans, to estimate the amount of ice frozen in the Martian soil.

The post Science Graphic of the Week: Mapping Mars’ Missing Ice appeared first on WIRED.








Cinematic Cuts Exploit How Your Brain Edits What You See

Thu, 09/04/2014 - 6:30am

It's amazing that film editing works, because it's so disruptive to the visual information coming into the brain, says Jeffrey Zacks, a neuroscientist at Washington University in St. Louis. On the other hand, Zacks says, our brains do quite a bit of editing of their own---and we're every bit as oblivious to that as we are to the film editor's cuts.

The post Cinematic Cuts Exploit How Your Brain Edits What You See appeared first on WIRED.








New Fabric Circuit Boards Can Be Worn, Washed, Stretched, and Shot

Wed, 09/03/2014 - 12:50pm
A team of engineers from Hong Kong Polytechnic University have created a fabric knitted with wiring that can be worn and even washed.






Fantastically Wrong: The Imaginary Radiation That Shocked Science and Ruined Its ‘Discoverer’

Wed, 09/03/2014 - 6:30am
In the winter of 1903, just eight years after the monumental discovery of X-rays, a French scientist by the name of René Blondlot stumbled upon a brand new form of radiation. He called them N-rays, after his town of Nancy, perhaps because naming them R-rays after himself would have been both unwieldy and self-absorbed.






How Movies Trick Your Brain Into Empathizing With Characters

Tue, 09/02/2014 - 6:30am
There’s a scene near the end of Black Swan, where Nina finally loses her grip on reality. And when people watch it, their brain activity bears some resemblance to a pattern that’s been observed in people with schizophrenia, said Talma Hendler, a neuroscientist at Tel Aviv University in Israel, said at a recent event here sponsored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.






WIRED Space Photo of the Day for September 2014

Mon, 09/01/2014 - 8:51pm
Follow Space Photo of the Day on Twitter The 2013 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery The 2012 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery For caption information and links to high-resolution images, please use the full-screen version of this gallery. For more mind-blowing space photos, see the entire WIRED Space Photo of the […]