April 30, 2013

U.S. residents who believe in the scientific consensus on global warming are more likely to support government action to curb emissions, regardless of whether they are Republican or Democrat, according to a study led by a CHANS-Net sociologist.

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April 25, 2013

CHANS-Net researchers have discovered that humans are passing antibiotic resistance to wildlife, especially in protected areas where numbers of humans are limited.

In the case of banded mongoose in a Botswana study, multidrug resistance among study social groups, or troops, was higher in the protected area than in troops living in village areas.

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March 25, 2013

Environmental education programs that took middle school students outdoors to learn helped minority students close a gap in environmental literacy, according to coupled human and natural systems research from North Carolina State University.

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March 12, 2013

Strictly protected areas such as national parks and biological reserves have been more effective at reducing deforestation in the Amazon rainforest than so-called sustainable-use areas that allow for controlled resource extraction, CHANS-Net scientists and their colleagues have found.

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Feb. 27, 2013

It's no secret that China is faced with some of the world's worst pollution. Until now, however, information on the magnitude, scope and impacts of a major contributor to that pollution -- human-caused nitrogen emissions -- was lacking.

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Feb. 18, 2013

Hurricane Sandy was a fearsome reminder that coastal communities are highly vulnerable to extreme weather events and environmental variability, and that vulnerability is only expected to increase with climate change.

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Feb. 1, 2013

For social animals such as schooling fish, the loss of their numbers to human activity could eventually threaten entire populations, according to research led by a CHANS-Net scientist that shows such animals rely heavily on grouping to effectively navigate their environment.

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Jan. 24, 2013

In Missouri forests, dense thickets of invasive honeysuckle decrease the light available to other plants, hog the attention of pollinators and offer nutrient-stingy berries to migrating birds. They also release toxins that decrease the germination of nearby native plants. Why, then, do studies of invasive species come to different conclusions about their effects and lead some organizations to suggest we accept their presence?

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Jan. 23, 2013

Hydraulically fractured natural gas wells are producing less wastewater per unit of gas recovered than conventional wells would. But the scale of fracking operations in the Marcellus shale region is so vast that the wastewater it produces threatens to overwhelm the region's wastewater disposal capacity, according to new analysis by a CHANS-Net researcher at Duke and a colleague at Kent State.

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Jan. 14, 2013

How do people adapt to forest fires?

That question underlies the interdisciplinary Forest People Fire (FPF) project and is the focus of the next U.S. Forest Service Landscape Science webinar on Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. EST.

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