Oct. 21, 2010

How do humans and their environment interact, and how can we develop an understanding of these processes to adapt to a planet undergoing far-reaching climate and other environmental changes?

To answer these and related questions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded 14 grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the country to study coupled natural and human systems.

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Sept. 21, 2011

Water quality and environmental health in Botswana; wetlands in a working landscape; the collapse of the ancient Maya and what that has to tell us about society and environmental change today.

These and other projects that address how humans and the environment interact are the focus of $21 million in National Science Foundation (NSF) grants to scientists, engineers and educators across the country to study coupled natural and human systems.

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Sept. 25, 2013

How and why is tea quality vulnerable to changing climate conditions, and how do these changes affect farming communities and land-use strategies?

Researchers funded by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH) program will use tea production and consumption systems as a case study to explore the complex interactions among human and natural systems.

They will look at how links among tea agroecosystems, markets and farmers are affected by increased climate variability and resulting socioecological feedbacks.

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Aug. 20, 2014

Mountain pine beetles, tiny bark beetles the size of grains of rice, have become widespread pests. The insects infest tree after tree in western North America, killing off entire swaths of forests during outbreaks.

The effects of climate change and other factors have led to the unprecedented epidemic. Tens of millions of acres of trees have been killed over the past 20 years.

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June 22, 2015

Scientists are certain: We’re entering a mass extinction that threatens humanity’s existence.

Paul Ehrlich, CHANS-Net member and senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and his coauthors call for fast action to conserve threatened species, populations, and habitat, but warn that the window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

"[The study] shows without any significant doubt that we are now entering the sixth great mass extinction event," said Ehrlich, professor of population studies in biology.

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June 3, 2015

The dynamic interplay of natural and human factors drives human and ecosystem adaptations in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia according to new research.

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April 6, 2015

The stereotypical trappings of urban living -- fine restaurants, boutique shopping, amazing people-watching – need to accommodate one more city dweller: wildlife.

Cities are traditionally seen as places for people, but many species of wildlife thrive in urban areas. Interactions between humans and wildlife happen more often in urban areas than any other place on Earth. These interactions affect human health, safety and welfare, in both positive and negative ways.

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April 2, 2015

By comparing and reflecting on their previous research, five former CHANS fellows from the class of 2012 have developed an analytic framework that other scholars can use when designing future interdisciplinary studies on farmer decision-making.

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March 6, 2015

Weather changes and the risks they pose are one of the biggest variables in agriculture. In many cases, farmers can reduce some of these risks by adapting their cropping practices to be more compatible with weather situations.

But not all farmers react to weather changes the same way. To better identify how farmers make weather-related decisions, two CHANS-Net researchers and their colleagues developed a framework to understand the causes and consequences of the decisions.

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Oct. 9, 2014

The Mountain Research Initiative invites all researchers studying global change in mountain regions to its Key Contact Workshop on Dec. 14 in San Francisco, just before the AGU Fall Meeting.

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