Public Library of Science

Syndicate content
Diverse perspectives on science and medicine
Updated: 1 hour 45 min ago

Meet our Editor-in-Chief at #ACSBOSTON in August | Booth 712

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 12:03pm
  Meet our Editor-in-Chief at #ACSBOSTON in August | Booth 712   Posted August 17, 2018 by PLOS ONE editors post-info PLOS ONE is excited to be exhibiting at this year’s American Chemical Society (ACS)

The Sickness Lurking Beneath World Cup Fever

Fri, 08/17/2018 - 12:02pm
  The Sickness Lurking Beneath World Cup Fever Posted August 16, 2018 by Dean Schillinger post-info While watching the World Cup, Dean Schillinger was reminded of the ongoing back-and-forth matchup between the soda industry and public

National Fossil Day 2018: Events, Part 1

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 1:07pm
  It’s that time of year again, and PLOS Paleontology Community is happy to highlight upcoming events associated with National Fossil Day (October 17, 2018). Many of these events are hosted by U.S. museums, institutions, and

New Book, “Run to the Light,” Chronicles a Journey with Batten Disease

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 1:06pm
  On Sunday, August 19, Taylor King will turn 20. On November 1, Laura King Edwards’s inspiring book “Run To The Light” will be published, by Bedazzled Ink. The memoir is an astonishing tale of

How to communicate basic research in schools – a case study using Drosophila

Wed, 08/15/2018 - 12:41pm
0000-0001-8462-0271   By Andreas Prokop, PhD, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester   The Manchester Fly Facility maintains an objective-driven, long-term science communication initiative which started in 2011 and promotes the importance of

Yoga, Depression, & Clinical Trial Critique 101

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:29pm
  A study piqued my curiosity in a news feed recently. Yoga could reduce depression symptoms, researchers said – but only if you expected it to (Uebelacker 2018). Yoga for depression, it turns out, is

Crowdsourcing plant phenomic data, bacterial niche construction abilities, protocell evolution, microRNA target prediction

Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:27pm
  Crowdsourcing plant phenomic data, bacterial niche construction abilities, protocell evolution, microRNA target prediction Posted August 13, 2018 by post-info Check out our Editors-in-Chief’s selection of papers from the July issue of PLOS Computational Biology. Crowdsourcing image analysis

The XV Collection: Perverse Outcomes of Novel Therapies

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 4:32pm
  The XV Collection: Perverse Outcomes of Novel Therapies Posted August 10, 2018 by post-info by Andrew Read Yale professor Steve Stearns once warned that the transition from Young Turk to Old Turkey happens quickly.

Fossil Friday Roundup: August 10, 2018

Fri, 08/10/2018 - 11:28am
  Featured Image: Triassic pentadactyl tracks from Argentina. From Citton et al. (2018). CC-BY.  Papers (All Open Access): Cambrian petalonamid Stromatoveris phylogenetically links Ediacaran biota to later animals (Palaeontology) Salvinialean megaspores in the Late Cretaceous

Power to the Patients: Co-design of Community-based Research

Thu, 08/09/2018 - 2:44pm
0000-0002-5625-3977 According to a 2015 statistic, the leading causes of death among adolescents in the US are unintentional accidents, suicide, and homicide. However, many scientists struggle to engage adolescents in research programs to study the

PLOS Biology in the media – July

Thu, 08/09/2018 - 2:43pm
  PLOS Biology in the media – July   post-info The year is flying past, and July has been another month with several of our papers making the news. This month we’re covering sleeping flies,

Is CRISPR Gene Editing Doomed, Even As Gene Therapy Enters the Clinic?

Thu, 08/09/2018 - 2:42pm
Anyone watching the recent 60 Minutes segment on CRISPR would conclude that the gene editing technology is on the brink of pouring forth a cascade of cures. But a recent study reveals a mess of missing

Crikey! We’re gonna need a bigger boat…

Thu, 08/09/2018 - 2:42pm
0000-0001-7794-0218 The first fossils of a giant ancestor of the great white shark have been discovered in Victoria, Australia. Philip Mullaly, a fossil enthusiast, was having a stroll down the beach at Victoria’s popular surf

Building research evidence towards reproducibility of animal research

Mon, 08/06/2018 - 3:27pm
  Building research evidence towards reproducibility of animal research   post-info Since our debut in late 2006, PLOS ONE has strived to promote best practices in research reporting as a way to improve reproducibility in

The Humility of Expertise

Mon, 08/06/2018 - 3:26pm
  Ed note: Today we welcome Junaid Nabi back to the blog. For more about Junaid, please see the bottom of this post. The following is adapted from a speech that was delivered as one of

How Can Africa Prevent the Next Haemorrhagic Fever Crisis? Invest in Research and Development

Fri, 08/03/2018 - 10:35am
  By Dr. Jenniffer Mabuka In 2014, West Africa encountered its worst recorded outbreak of Ebola with over 11,000 reported deaths. The memory of this crisis hadn’t faded yet when Ebola reared its ugly head

Urban Ecology: where the wild meets the city

Thu, 08/02/2018 - 5:11pm
  Urban Ecology: where the wild meets the city   post-info Urban ecosystems are expanding around the world as people migrate to cities and the human population continues to grow. What happens to other species

How the Media Oversimplifies DNA Testing of Separated Families

Thu, 08/02/2018 - 5:10pm
When the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) was passed to unify “the existing patchwork of State and Federal laws,” the language was broad enough to apply to just about any use of information

Just what is ‘civil society’?

Thu, 08/02/2018 - 5:10pm
  How does civil society ‘look and feel’ in the context of noncommunicable disease prevention and treatment? I mused on this last week but realised I didn’t know much about the concept of civil society

Europe Expanded the “No Elsevier Deal” Zone & This Could Change Everything

Tue, 07/31/2018 - 11:46am
      A couple of heavy-duty battering rams have hit the journal subscription system in Europe. And they are so big, this will likely set off a chain reaction that changes the scholarly communication