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Walk the walk, talk the talk: Implications of dual-tasking on dementia research

Fri, 07/03/2015 - 10:00am

By Ríona Mc Ardle You turn the street corner and bump into an old friend. After the initial greetings and exclamations of “It’s so good to see you!” and “Has it been that long?”, your friend inquires as to where … Continue reading »

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Down with time changes plus the NY Times hearty series on cardio developments

Thu, 07/02/2015 - 10:15pm

WAIT A SECOND It must have seemed like a good idea at the time, the time being 1972, a time before computers ran the world. That’s when it was decided that a way must be invented to keep precision atomic … Continue reading »

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PLOS Recommended Data Repositories

Thu, 07/02/2015 - 4:39pm

In line with our updated Data Policy, we are pleased to announce a PLOS Data Repository Recommendation Guide. To support the selection of data repositories for authors, PLOS has identified a set of established repositories, which are recognized and trusted within their respective communities. To … Continue reading »

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Fossil Lizard Showcases Wyoming’s Tropical Wonderland

Thu, 07/02/2015 - 10:41am

Wyoming is a beautiful place, but usually it is associated more with open range, cowboys, mountains, and skiing than it is with palm trees and alligators. What a difference 48 million years makes! Fossils in the rocks of the Bridger Formation, spanning … Continue reading »

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Aicardi Syndrome: Genome Sequencing Illuminates Another Rare Disease

Thu, 07/02/2015 - 8:18am

As my inbox fills with ever more updates on the number of human genomes sequenced and the plummeting time and cost of next next next generation sequencing, I find myself hitting delete more and more often. Instead, I’m drawn to … Continue reading »

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Can Lightning Strike an Indoor Pool?

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 8:39pm

Two swimming pool weather policies have surprised me in recent years. One was when I showed up to swim laps at an outdoor pool as it was beginning to drizzle. “Come on in,” I was told; as long as there … Continue reading »

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Another 5 Things to Know About Meta-Analysis

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 7:52pm

  Last year I wrote a post of “5 Key Things to Know About Meta-Analysis”. It was a great way to focus – but it was hard keeping to only 5. With meta-analyses booming, including many that are poorly done or misinterpreted, … Continue reading »

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Advocating CBT for Psychosis: “Ultimately it is all political.”

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 12:32pm

Political… Or just cynical? Professor Paul Salkovskis and his colleagues organized a lively, thought-provoking conference at University of Bath “Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia: How well do we understand and what should we do to improve how we help?” Presenters and … Continue reading »

The post Advocating CBT for Psychosis: “Ultimately it is all political.” appeared first on PLOS Blogs Network.

Do allergy meds contribute to weight gain?

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 9:53am

“Achoo!!” Some folks have allergies that flare up on a seasonal basis. This spring has certainly not been kind to this group. But if you’re like me, battling your allergies is a year-round affair. The common antihistaimnes available at every … Continue reading »

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‘Does that mean you’re not a scientist anymore?’ Getting Science Communication Right

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 2:00pm

PLOS BLOGS welcomes Sam Illingworth, a professor of physics and science communication, with this guest post. Read his full bio below. By Sam Illingworth This is a snippet from a recent dinner party conversation: Random: So, what job do you do? Me: … Continue reading »

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Using Video Games to Model Real Life Outbreaks

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 9:00am

Those of you who know me know that I’m a video game nerd. And comic book nerd. And just nerdy nerd in general. So when I read an article that used World of Warcraft to model disease outbreaks, I jumped … Continue reading »

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Did you know ‘storm spotters’ in your community keep you safe during severe weather?

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 4:00am

Civic minded citizen scientists in your community help meteorologists and the National Weather Service stay abreast of inclement weather with on-the-ground data. Earlier this week, the Midwest and Northeast were slammed with tornados and thunderstorms that grounded planes and held … Continue reading »

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Consistently poor coverage of mental health issues in The Guardian

Sat, 06/27/2015 - 3:12am

Issuing a readers’ advisory: The Guardian provides misleading, badly skewed coverage of mental health issues vitally important to mental health service users. Stories in The Guardian can confuse and disempower mental health service users seeking information for difficult decisions about … Continue reading »

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Highlights from the 2015 Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society

Fri, 06/26/2015 - 11:06am

Going to conferences is one of my favorite aspects about being a scientist. As a PhD student, I spend a lot of my life in solitude: when I read new literature, when I program new experiments, or when I conduct … Continue reading »

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Obamacare lives and Kennewick Man is a Native American

Thu, 06/25/2015 - 11:11pm

WHEW! The Affordable Care Act (aka ACA, aka Obamacare) subsidies to help people buy health insurance got saved by the US Supreme Court after all, with the somewhat unexpected help (unexpected by me, anyway) of Chief Justice John Roberts. Here’s … Continue reading »

The post Obamacare lives and Kennewick Man is a Native American appeared first on PLOS Blogs Network.

Calling All Bloggers for ISMB/ECCB 2015

Thu, 06/25/2015 - 12:13pm

ISMB/ECCB 2015 in Dubin, Ireland, is fast approaching and we invite you to be involved in the live coverage of the event.   In previous years, ISMB has been way ahead of the social media curve with microblogging in 2008, … Continue reading »

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ISMB/ECCB 2015

Thu, 06/25/2015 - 11:58am

Heading to Dublin for ISMB/ECCB 2015? Swing by Booth 1 and say hello to PLOS! Many of the journal’s academic editors will be in attendance, and PLOS Computational Biology staff Gary Beardmore and Bethany Coates will be manning the booth, … Continue reading »

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Research Matters

Wed, 06/24/2015 - 4:05pm

Research Matters is a new article series in which active scientists speak directly about why basic research in their field matters. It bridges the gap between academic research and the public by explaining how diverse fundamental research assures real and … Continue reading »

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The problem with P values: defining clinical vs. statistical significance

Wed, 06/24/2015 - 3:04pm

  Today we warmly welcome guest writer Sean Sinden to PLOS Public Health Perspectives. His biography is at the end of the post. The practice of null hypothesis testing has traditionally been used to interpret the results of studies in … Continue reading »

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Healthcare In Danger: what happens when it all goes wrong?

Wed, 06/24/2015 - 7:54am

This week on PLOS Translational Global Health, emergency physician and humanitarian & global health doctor, Jenny Jamieson, writes about some of the tacit dangers of delivering healthcare in low-resource settings. As healthcare workers, some of us travel to resource-limited settings … Continue reading »

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